What to do with a Moose Skull…

We try to use every part that we can of every animal we harvest.  We consume the meat, preserve soup from the bones, eat the tongue and heart, donate the hides to the First Nations and the bottom jaw is given to the Ministry of Natural Resources to assess the health of the population.

What to do with a Moose Skull... November

Selling the skull isn’t an option for two reasons:

  • I believe it’s not allowed by law in Ontario (despite seeing many of them in furniture stores in our city).
  • I don’t feel right selling it simply as a decoration.  Something is unsettling to me about the possible glorification of the animal by someone with no connection to its life or death.  This animal was harvested (killed) on October 19th, 2010 between 9:23AM and 9:27AM.  I returned to the same spot she passed on the Thursday of our hunt this year (she died within 15 feet of the 6th photo in this post from October).  I just don’t feel comfortable with the idea that this should merely be a decoration for someone without a connection to this.I am not convinced this feeling is entirely (or even remotely) logical but it’s a strong feeling that I have and that I follow.

The forest will consume the skull if it’s left long enough.  Critters will try to extract its calcium (this is especially true of antlers) and the skull will slowly decompose into the soil as well.

This animal was harvested (killed) on October 19th, 2010 between 9:23AM and 9:27AM.  I returned to the same spot she passed on the Thursday of our hunt this year (she died within 15 feet of the 6th photo in this post from October).

What to do with a Moose Skull... November

During the hunt I shared the top photo on Instagram.  An acquaintance (who happens to be vegetarian) asked if I would consider bringing it back to the city to donate to a children’s education program.  The skull now resides at Evergreen Brickworks where it’s used to educate kids.  It joins a small collection of other animal skulls that are used to connect kids to nature.

I thought I’d share because there are many programs that would gladly benefit from pieces of nature like this (including those from animals that pass naturally) and it’s been a thrill to see the excitement of kids (and even adults) connect with nature in a way that I have taken a little for granted and thought it might inspire others to find another use for the harvest they partake in.

A giant thanks to Evergreen and Becky for the idea!

Comments

  1. Very Georgia O’Keeffe, your last photograph.

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