They Tapped That (and you can too on Sunday)

We have written about our friends at Not Far from the Tree several times (some of those are here and here).  We simply adore them and have met many great people and friends through them.  Their website is here.

The group was formed by Toronto resident (and New Brunswick native), Laura Reinsborough is a passionate advocate of our city, the environment, local eating and the intersection of all 3.  Laura, along with a small army of volunteers, are changing our city.

The non-profit program started by offering a service to home owners with fruit trees.  Fruit trees are lovely but can be a source of pain through their abundance – once you’ve eaten, shared  and preserved all you can, the remaining fruit often drops to the ground, makes a mess, smells, attract flies, gets in the way of the lawnmower, etc.  Not Far From the Tree will come to your house and clear your tree of all it’s fruit.  1/3 of the fruit goes to the tree owner, 1/3 to the volunteers and 1/3 to charity.

They harvested 8,135 pounds of fruit downtown Toronto last year.

Now they’ve expanded their focus:

They Tapped That (and you can too on Sunday)

The program is largely one to make us think different about the urban forest, our city and food sources.  The program is supported by the city (there had been initial reports of concerns that were completely overcome) and the group has tapped 12 urban Norway Maple trees to gather the syrup.  There is a sugaring off party this Sunday, March 14.  The event runs from 1-4pm (you can find the details here).

T-shirts are also available on their website.

I love the imagination of Laura and her team.  I adore that there will be people gathered around a late winter harvest from within our city walls.

If you’re in the area and want to meet some great people, be sure to pop by.  We haven’t planned our weekend yet but if we can make it, we’ll be there…

New York Schools (and California) ban homemade baked goods

In an effort to curb childhood obesity, the New York school system banned most baked goods.  The ban includes fundraising and was communicated to parents in June though it`s become a hot topic as the impact to the schools, teams and intramural groups is felt much stronger.  Apparently California has done a lot of this in the past.

The original memo is here.

It`s easy to pick things apart and simply protest.  When I first read about this, my reaction was decisive.  I`ve had a chance to count to 3, hold my breath and consider the intent and understand more about what they are trying to accomplish.

Where I continue to struggle is the two main areas children receive food in school (other than from home): the vending machine and the cafeteria.

Vending machines have a new supplier and schools must procure their snacks from them.  The options will include calorie-controlled portions, baked chip-like products, sugar-free granola and the like.  Commercially produced products with `regulated` calorie counts are considered more favourable than homemade food for health.  If we are concerned with such limits why not educate students (and their families), how to calculate calories and portions of their recipes.  Think of the life lessons, impact on family diet and learning that could occur in math, science and health around all of this.  Why can we not hold home chefs accountable to the same standards we apply to commercial producers of food?

When we message that prepackaged food is the only safe way to control caloric, fat and sugar intake, we are in trouble.

The cafeteria also leaves me wanting.  If you were studying in Manhattan this month and a member of the Junior High School or High School Trend lunch menu, you could eat the following diet over the 23-days of March:

  • 9 days of hamburgers
  • 11 days of pizza
  • More choices include tacos, mozzarella sticks, fish nuggets, and chicken tenders.

You can browse all of the school menus here.

It all reminds me of Jamie`s Schhol Dinners (Jamie Oliver) from the UK:

No sleep till Brooklyn (or Manhattan) – looking for New York food ideas

Dana and I have booked our trip to New York and we’re most excited.  4 days in Brooklyn followed by 4 days in Manhattan.  Friends are meeting us for the last half of the trip (Manhattan) – we’ve all been discussing this trip for a few years (since we journeyed to Chicago).

Dana has been to New York several times and adores it.  I have never been and am excited to see it.

We’ve been probing Twitter for the last few days as well as emailing friends (both those who we’ve known in person as well as the digital kind :)) and we’re blown away by the ideas we’ve received so far.  Farms, chocolate shops, farmers market, restaurants, bars and more are all on our hit list.

We’ll be putting together some articles and a Google map of the ideas we receive and share them here (unless you send us a treasured secret that you don’t want shared…laugh).

For now, we’re looking for any other recommendations.  Are there any destinations (places you’ve been, read about, adore or fantasize about) to share out here?  We’d love to hear them.  Use the comments or fire me an email (joel (a) elevenideas.ca) and we’ll share our guide to New York when we return and have compiled our findings!

Cheap Tuesday Gourmet: The Mighty Rutabaga

I have never cooked one.  I didn`t really know what to do with it.  So I bought 4.

The rutabaga is (as I later learned) basically a sweet turnip.  It has a highly waxed exterior that can be peeled with a good peeler or a knife and firm flesh that is solid throughout.  You`ll need a good knife to cut it raw as it`s very solid.

When I got home I scoured a few books.  I found a recipe for glazed turnips by Julia child which I used as my base but derived from there and transformed this into a sweet soup.

Cheap Tuesday Gourmet: The Mighty Rutabaga Rutabaga Cooking Recipes Cheap Tuesday Gourmet [Read more...]

Toughest time of year…

The wonderful weather this weekend was an awesome sight.  It was a sign that spring is indeed close; even if it’s not quite as close as it appeared with the warm sun of March.

My lifestyle has changed a lot in the last 2 years.  Writing on conscious food choices (daily) as well as the new friends, conversations and focus that has entered our life as a result has rendered Dana and I into different people.  We still fall back to processed food, and even the occasional fast food, but that is happening less and less.

I really have fallen in love with the humble squash and all it can do.  We’ve had gnocchi, soup, chunks and mashed versions and I’ve loved them all.  We have eaten significantly higher amounts of root vegetables this year than previous years and we’re better off because of it.

We haven’t had the time to trek across the city on the weekends to head to the one winter market I know of (Green Barn Farmer’s Market at Wychwood Barns).  Saturday morning have been reserved to dog parks, hiking and playing in the snow so it’s a good kind of busy and an important kind of busy.

Local stores (large and small) offered choices that worked for us.  Parsnips, carrots, squash, apples, turnips, greenhouse options and more.  It was a fun challenge to fill the cart with items that were local (or localish) and learn what to do with them.

Things began to change about a month to 6 weeks ago.  Most of the same product existed but to buy it local you had to buy in quantity.  You could buy carrots if you were willing to buy a 5-pound bag.  You could buy onions by 10-pounds locally but all of the single onions were imported.  Quantity presents a problem in an apartment with 1 closet and 2 people.

The options have become fewer still.  I have gone to the grocery store 3 or 4 times in a row expecting to come home with a bounty and found myself coming home with less than a bag full as I can’t find the options that I am looking for.  Our preserved vegetables are getting a workout and I’m thrilled we have those to fall back on – tomato soup, canned peas, runner and romano beans.  It’s a reminder to do even more next year.

The frustration is compounded by the knowledge that the products I search actually exist.  Wether it’s stores insisting on cheapest pricing or the supply chain not being able to produce the quantity they need, the ability to buy seasonal food from less than 5,000 kilometers away is a scarce opportunity these days; at least in retail.

Potatoes, carrots, onions, sprouts, beets and cabbage are all availblelocally through the right connections today.  It’s just very difficult to find them – something we will remember when bottling and dehydrating the summer and autumn bounties next year.

Any other sources of local out there in the late winter/ early spring?

Michael Duggan – 9 Beer (Inda Pale Ale and Craft Beer from Toronto)

It was a darling friend`s birthday last night.  There were about 40 people for dinner and then drinks on the Danforth (Lolita`s Lust – who were great hosts).

After completing dinner we migrated upstairs to an intimate private lounge.  I pulled up to the bar and noticed a beer I hadn`t tried before which is always an exciting view for me.  A new unopened beer is kind of like seeing all those gifts at Christmas when you were a kid.  You knew some would be the coolest things in the world and others would be socks but the prospect of what they could be made them all equally exciting.

To continue the analogy of Christmas gifts; 9 beer is one of the cool gifts and something worth getting excited for.

Michael Duggan   9 Beer (Inda Pale Ale and Craft Beer from Toronto)

I was pleasantly surprised to find my mouth explode with flavor as I took my first sip of beer.  It was super hoppy and a strong ale that we so often lack in Canada.  So many of our beers, including many of our Ontario Craft beer, seem to take the middle ground on taste.  like Goldilocks, they aren`t too bitter and aren`t too weak, they are their own version of what`s `just right.`  This isn`t necesarilly a bad thing – it`s just that there`s a lot in the middle.  U.S. craft beer has such a size (around 3,000 craft breweries) that their options are vast and it`s great to see our options expanding north of the border.

9 is an India Pale Ale.  For the uninitiated, this means it is very full of flavor and most consider it bitter.  Some consider it an acquired taste though converts would argue that they are not full of flavor – it`s that others are boring and weak.

I tried an experiment – I shared tastes of the beer with friends.  Some are craft beer junkies, many are not even beer fans.  I thought the results would be easy – that the `veterans` would like it and others would find 9 to be overpowering.  I was wrong.  Of the 8 or 9 friends who tried it, they all found it to be interesting or great.  I`m not convinced this is an ale for all people but I do find it a wonderful beer for my tastes.

A quick bit of research on Michael Duggan shed some light on this great beer that appeared to come from nowhere.  His fingerprints are all over Toronto`s beer history.  He was the original brewmaster at Mill Street Brewery and worked at Cèst What, Robert Simpson and ran operations at Cool Brewery in the west end of the city.

Mr. Duggan has taken the leap of faith into his own brand which includes the brewery and an attached restaurant and pub (on Victoria Street near Queen and Yonge in the heart of the city).  The location opened in late October last year and provides a testing ground for established product as well as new experiments.

Our list of places to visit in Toronto just grew by one!

Cowbell Toronto – A butchery walkthrough courtesy of Margaret Mulligan

I recently had the honour of being invited to a butchery demo in the basement of Cowbell (a very unique restaurant in Toronto).  Our friend Margaret Mulligan (the fabulous photographer) was shooting the session and, along with Head Chef, Mark Cutrara, I was offered to come along.  I always love the chance to explore something I haven’t seen or tried before – we only write about the experiences that we liked or loved.  This was one to love.  Today’s article is art 1 of 3 and is a serious comparison of a butcher, a chef and a vegetarian.  All of the photos are hers.   To see the entire series of posts, click here.

Before scrolling, please understand that this post may be too graphic for some.  It’s a photo essay that walks you through our butchery session that we experienced.  I like to think that this is what Kerouac meant by “Naked Lunch” when he gave the term to William S. Burroughs.

Margaret’s photography is stunning.  She has a passion for food and photography and the intersection of the two.  Her professional site is here and her personal photo blog here.

Note the small amount of waste captured towards the end of the photos.  The work of Ryan and Mark is inspirational to me and I highly recommend attending a session if you can.  Hope you’ve enjoyed the series!

Cowbell Toronto   A butchery walkthrough courtesy of Margaret Mulligan

Cowbell Toronto   A butchery walkthrough courtesy of Margaret Mulligan

Cowbell, Toronto – a different approach to butchery

I recently had the honour of being invited to a butchery demo in the basement of Cowbell (a very unique restaurant in Toronto).  Our friend Margaret Mulligan (the fabulous photographer) was shooting the session and, along with Head Chef, Mark Cutrara, I was offered to come along.  I always love the chance to explore something I haven’t seen or tried before – we only write about the experiences that we liked or loved.  This was one to love.  Today’s article is art 1 of 3 and is a serious comparison of a butcher, a chef and a vegetarian.  All of the photos are hers.   To see the entire series of posts, click here.

There are several photos below which include an active butchery session.  Graphic as they may be for some, we have been careful to choose what we believe is a balance between sharing an important story of sustainable eating and the sensibilities of many.  The most graphic photos are not part of what follows.

Ryan Donovan worked at the Healthy Butcher for years before joining Mark Cutrara at Cowbell.  His is passionate about butchery and mastering a craft that is disappearing.  There is a theme of sustaining at cowbell (butchery, preserving, charcuterie, baking) which is also contrasted by a the welcoming of newer techniques (Sous Vide plays a significant role in the kitchen as an example).

Ryan and Chef Mark Cutrara lead a group of 10 people through the butchery of a 100+ pound lamb.  It’s early evening when a group of 10 people enter the basement prep kitchen and are greeted by the graphic reality of the task at hand.  For some it’s the first time to see an animal in this state (it has arrived skinned and cleaned from the abattoir) and even after seeing hundreds of deer and moose in a similar state it is a raw site.  The next 3-hours is an incredible sharing of information, explanation of philosophy and technique and education on sustainability.

“There are less and less butchers today – even in butcher shops.”  Many restaurants order pre-butchered meat or roasts of which they cut into portions that they wish to serve.  More and more butchers are ordering from the same suppliers and the art becomes further threatened.  Between farming and butchering we are dreadfully risking losing the ability to actually feed ourselves independently.

Cowbell, Toronto   a different approach to butchery

The session starts when Ryan produces a scale.  He places it on the table and rests a bowl on top of it.  Since Cowbell buys the animal based on weight, the bones cost as much per pound as any “fine” cut of meat.  There is absolute clarity that the use of the entire animal is not simply a financial decision – use of the entire animal is a vision that is tied to animal husbandry, their vision of sustainability and the beliefs they share with the farmer (Dingo Farms in Bradford in this case).  The total waste of this animal was 1.31 pounds – less than 1%.

The education process continues as I hear the words “retail cuts” for the first time.  The gentlemen mention that one of the advantages of self-butchery is not having to produce these things.  I realize that they are referring to dissecting the animal differently than what I see on styrofoam and am pulled deeply into the conversation.  The explanation of retail cuts is simply what you find in the grocery store.  Rib-eye, sirloin and the like.

Cowbell, Toronto   a different approach to butchery

The team explains that individual muscles are always separated by layers of fat (much of the butchery can be done by hand without a knife).  As each muscle performs a different function and is a different texture from the others, each requires different cooking methods to extract the most from the cuts.  Many retail pieces include multiple muscle groups (look for layers of fat).

I remember studying first aid and being explained that many of our muscles work in groups of 2 and the muscles alternate flexing/relaxing in order to allow us to move.  As you flex your bicep, your triceps becomes relaxed.  The more a muscle is worked, the more flavor it can develop and the tougher it can become.

The use of the animal is fascinating.  They render fat, make sausage, prepare stock and brine larger cuts.  The animal will last several weeks to feed the restaurant and they will only bring another lamb in once this one is complete.

The workshop end over a beer and tastes of their charcuterie and preserves.  The chef and butcher share stories, field questions and share their passion with the group.  Details are offered on their site and are worth every penny.

Over the weekend we will be adding a more detailed gallery of the workshop – the photos are more graphic than shown here and we will share a link on the main page for those who wish to explore more.

A steakhouse with no steaks; a fascinating restaurant (Cowbell, Toronto)

I recently had the honour of being invited to a butchery demo in the basement of Cowbell (a very unique restaurant in Toronto).  Our friend Margaret Mulligan (the fabulous photographer) was shooting the session and, along with Head Chef, Mark Cutrara, I was offered to come along.  I always love the chance to explore something I haven’t seen or tried before – we only write about the experiences that we liked or loved.  This was one to love.  Today’s article is art 1 of 3 and is a serious comparison of a butcher, a chef and a vegetarian.  All of the photos are hers.   To see the entire series of posts, click here.

A steakhouse with no steaks; a fascinating restaurant (Cowbell, Toronto)

The concept of Cowbell seems easy enough to understand on it`s surface: it`s a sustainable restaurant that works closely with select Farmer`s concerned with animal husbandry and provide top quality (and top dollar) product to the restaurant for them to butcher in-house and then cook nose-to-tail with a sustainable focus.

Chef Mark Cutrara starts to explain some of his dilemma when he explains that an 800 pound carcass could have less than 20 steaks.  There are plenty of other great cuts beyond steak but it`s clear that he could sell out of steak the night he butchers a cow and still have meat for weeks (or longer) and no steak offering on the menu.  This was a struggle when they first opened – customers would enter with anticipation of ordering a steak and be disappointed or confused about the offerings on the menu.

Speaking of said menu, it is written in chalk.  Some cuts yield three or four dishes per animal.  As the dish sells out, it is replaced and may not return (if at all) for several weeks until the current animal is consumed and replaced by the next animal.

A steakhouse with no steaks; a fascinating restaurant (Cowbell, Toronto)

A revelation hit the restaurant around the price they paid for their featured product.  When they bought an entire cow for $3.50 a pound, filet was worth the same amount as silverskin, bones, fat and tongue (more on their approach to butchery and Ryan Donovan tomorrow).  Everything was just as valuable as everything else – ethically and financially.  A different method of approaching large proteins was needed in the kitchen and staff would have to be trained extensively to describe and educate the patrons of the restaurant.

A single dinner will likely include several different preparations from the same animal.  You may get a piece of steak paired with charcuterie, a sausage or other cut from the same animal to ensure the restaurant cycles through the whole animal in the course of it`s use.  They make their own charcuterie in-house, render fats and cook with as much as 99% of the animal.

I love the story of their hamburger as an example of their vision.  The beef is ground in-house.  It is matched with greens from a farm that used compost created by the cows to fertilize it`s vegetables.  Buttermilk (from in-house churned butter) is part of the bun which is baked in the basement.  Mark explains it`s a series of tightly entwined closed concentric circles that make up the dish.

The restaurant recently eliminated olive oil from the menu, replacing it with their own rendered fats, canola and soya oil – items that can be sourced locally and are part of our own terroir.

There is a lot of things happening here that add to the localization and sustainability of the menu.  Connections with farmers allow them to provide input into diet and exercise based on what they are receiving from the farmer.  Preserving a local bounty (curing charcutire and pickling included) allows the flavors of the spring to come through year around.  Locally sourcing produce (including in the winter) and working directly with farmers allows the restaurant to consistently provide stunning flavor without compromise.  In-house baking, sous vide and using a variety of animals (fish, venison, pork, lamb and potentially bison and others) allow great diversity.

Cowbell allows us to truly taste what it is to eat with a sense of HERE; it also helps us learn what that means.

Similarities between vegetarians, butchers and chefs

I recently had the honour of being invited to a butchery demo in the basement of Cowbell (a very unique restaurant in Toronto).  Our friend Margaret Mulligan (the fabulous photographer) was shooting the session and, along with Head Chef, Mark Cutrara, I was offered to come along.  I always love the chance to explore something I haven’t seen or tried before – we only write about the experiences that we liked or loved.  This was one to love.  Today’s article is art 1 of 3 and is a serious comparison of a butcher, a chef and a vegetarian.  All of the photos are hers.   To see the entire series of posts, click here.

“When people write about us they often pit us against vegetarians, and that’s not what we’re trying to do.”  Ryan Donovan said this as he stood behind the butcher block of the restaurant he has helped build.  He is all things “B” – butcher, baker and breads are all of his domain here.  He is also very serious.

“Let me be clear.  We need to eat less meat.”  He continues to share a vision similar to that of Michael Pollan.  Leafy greens should form a large part of our diet and we need to lower our impact and increase our health through a radical change of how we view our diet.

It may sound slightly mad from a butcher and part of the force behind one of Toronto’s leading meat restaurants.  It shouldn’t be shocking that Executive Chef Mark Cutrara has the same vision.   Both a focused and firm on their vision – and neither has lost it.

My personal relationship with meat has been a conscious and complicated one.  Hunting and fishing runs through my family for more than 200 years in North America and I was raised on my share of it.  I spent 5-years of my life not eating pork, beef or wild game before coming around full circle to organize the hunting camp I grew up within (more on the entire story is here).

I understand why people struggle with hunting and, on a bigger scale, meat in general.  I have also had (and have) many dear friends in life who are devout vegetarians.  I firmly beleive that food hunters and vegetarians have much more in common with each other than with many others.

William S. Burroughs wrote the Naked Lunch.  Many find it surprising to find out that it was Jack Kerouac who actually came up with the title and proposed it to Burroughs.  “The title means exactly what the words say: naked lunch, a frozen moment when everyone sees what is on the end of every fork.”

It`s an oversimplification with plenty of exceptions to state that a vegetarian and a hunter are fully conscious of what`s on the plate – one makes a conscious decision that they cannot consume it while the other decides they can.  It`s also something I have found to often ring true in my own experiences.

Similarities between vegetarians, butchers and chefs

Ryan and Mark are incredibly conscious of what is being served on their plates.  They recognize what is on the end of their forks.  They are concerned about the quality of life their animals had and buy direct from Farmer`s who do the same.  They purchase whole animals direct from farmers and butcher them to cook nose to tail to use as much of the animal as possible.  We`ll show how they use as much as 99% of an animal within the restaurant.

The two gentlemen recognize that meat does not come from or grow on styrofoam.  There is a conscious acceptance (and excitement) about their product that appears to come from a similar basis that many vegetarians establish their rejection of meat.  They both see the Naked Lunch and make opposite decisions for themselves as individuals.

What appears to be diametrically opposed views may actually be more closely related than views from the middle.  although there are plenty of exceptions, perhaps it`s as simple as the two sides of the same coin.