Keeping Beer Cold in the Woods (and an introduction to the next 10 posts)

Before we get to the larger portion of this post, I’m sure some of you are simply here to learn how to cool beer (without freezing it) while in the woods.  This lesson works year round and will work in any body of water:

Keeping Beer Cold in the Woods (and an introduction to the next 10 posts) October

Full cans of beer float (in this case we used barrels of rainwater)!  Note that this doesn’t work so well with cans of pop which simply sink (I think the can is heavier).  This will chill warm beer in the summer and – as long as the water doesn’t freeze – will keep your beer cold without going to ice.  In the summer you can use the water in a lake or a stream to chill them out.

Regular readers will know that I have just returned from a week in the woods hunting moose.  I had pre-written a series of posts and tweets about my general perspective on hunting and how different it is from what many may (or may not) think.  I’ve been back for 4 days and am glad to say it was a great hunt.

When I was in the woods I kept a journal of all 9 days of my hunt.  I will be posting each of these in order from tomorrow through next week and post each one exactly one week after each happened (i.e. tomorrows post is from hand written notes from exactly a week before).

I am hoping that this format gives readers an idea of what a group hunt is really like and shares insight into the world of sustenance hunting.  It won’t always be the easiest thing to read and all of it is my interpretation of the hunt.

I will not include gory photos or stories about the hunters themselves.  The personal stories are powerful and a massive part of why I go hunting – but this is not the venue to talk about stories of others – that’s not the deal they signed up for and not fair to them.  Taking this part of the story out of the story only paints a small part of a much bigger whole – I am hoping that the stories we posted in previous weeks would give some idea as to the bigger picture.  It is tough knowing that these stories would share a much bigger value to what we do – you’ll have to take my word on it (or not :)).

Some of the posts will be tough to read for many – this will not be a glamorized image of the hunt.  I, of course, have my own biases but hope to paint a whole picture of the hunt and went I went through of part of it.  I am hoping the last 10 days has been a good intro to my perspective about a topic that is difficult for many.  If you want an idea of what it’s like to be on a group hunt (hint: it’s a lot of sitting still), I hope this gives you an idea of what it’s like to be a hunter – and a member of a very real tribe.

We’ll be returning to food posts once the play-by-play of the hunt is over.  By then I’ll have a stockpile of information and topics to share – including several posts from another trip to the UK (I leave on Tuesday).  In the meantime, hope to see comments (including respectful challenges and questions) to continue as we go!

Comments

  1. One of my best memories of group hunting was the sitting still time. As you sit the sounds of the forest slowly become clearer. At first you’re deafened by the noise of the atv that you rode to your post, but then the natural sounds gradually take over. Wind in the trees, mice in the undergrowth, the flapping of birds flying overhead, and if you’re lucky the crunch of deer or moose moving cautiously through the bush close by.

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