I love plates and dishes at cottages

Is there anything better than a hodgepodge of plates in a cottage?

I love plates and dishes at cottages October

I love plates and dishes at cottages October

I love the apparent random collections of plates that fill a cabin.  What appears to be a series of random glassware is often anything but.  We have plates that are collected from years of potlucks, drop-ins, forgotten leave behinds and good will donations from visitors and members of our cabin.

Many of the plates in our cabin have been around for it’s entire history – which reminds me of the infamous winter of 1969 and my father’s first visit to the cabin that spring (I was born 4 years later).

The drive to the cabin was very different in the 1960s and 1970s.  The road was tricky (at best) and could take up to 5 hours to travel about 10 kilometres from pavement.  The drive was conducted by tractor, jeep or land rover and included a scary drive up steep incline which also functioned as a torrent creek.  Getting to the cabin in the winter was not an option.

A quick drive to the cabin in the mid spring revealed disaster – a heavy load of snow had caused the roof to collapse.  All four walls were laying on the ground and the roof was on the floor of the cabin.  A series of phone calls made there way to my father who was part of the rebuilding crew who stayed in tents and raised the roof again.

The remarkable part of this story is that none of the windows (or plates) were broken.  It was as if a giant had lifted the roof, gently rested each wall on the ground and placed the roof on the floor.  A single pane of glass was broken (in a cabinet if I recall correctly).  A large sliding door, all windows and some of these plates survived.

The reality of the story is fascinating, if not remarkable.  The massive amount of snow which crippled the roof was the same thing that saved the glass – when the walls gave way they were stopped from crashing to the ground by massive snow banks which slowly placed the roof n the floor as they melted over weeks.  It would make for stunning time-lapse photography!

We posted a similar post recently on coffee cups – see that here.

Comments

  1. It is funny to see some of those plates again! They are familiar cottage plates across Ontario.

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