How to Freeze Leftover Lobster

Having a plethora of excess lobster meat isn’t exactly a typical problem around our house (though I wish it were) but it has happened on occasion.  Oddly, one of the most frequent questions I’ve heard about lobster is, “Can I freeze leftovers?”

How to Freeze Leftover Lobster LobsterAs I’ve shared in the past, my Acadian Mother ate lobster as a child when lobster lacked the prestige that we give it today.  Wealthy families sent their children to school with the more expensive, imported and English product called Spam (yes, canned ham), while the ‘deprived’ kids of fishermen (there were few, if any, fisherwomen in her community) had to struggle their way through repeated offerings of leftover lobster.

Lobster can be easily frozen and lasts quite well as long as it is protected in the freezer.  Protecting it is easy – surround it in some lightly salted water or fish broth.  Avoid the water it was cooked in (it should be way too salty), pack your meat in a freezer bag or container and then fill with the liquid.  You can make a fresh batch of salt water or, if you were lucky enough to eat mussels recently you can use the liqueur from them.

Do not freeze them in their shells.

If you’re not sure where to start with lobster, check out our full series on how to buy, cook, eat and use lobster here.  You may also be interested in our much shorter crab series which freezes the meat in a similar way.

What would you do with a bunch of lobster meat?

Comments

  1. What a GREAT picture. I would have loved to have been a ‘deprived’ child of a fisherman!

    • Susan,

      Thanks so much!

      It really is amazing about lobster vs/ spam isn’t it? I still have relatives who can’t eat it as they relate it to a lot of emotional ties to their past. There was such an emphasis on English things being ‘cool’ and French things being less so. It went was fr as people changing the spelling of their names to an Anglicized version (i.e. The Blancs became the Whites) and value placed on those things from afar. It’s tough to believe it’s all been in this lifetime!
      :)

      J

  2. I am not sure if it would work with water but I have been successfully freezing left over crab meet by freezing it in milk instead of water. For some reason the crab once thawed tastes amazingly fresh. That’s how we roll in British Columbia ha ha.

    • I like how you roll in BC Dave (though there is probably a joke to be had somewhere in there…) :)

      There’s another comment (from another Dave) that shares his testimonial for this exact technique (milk) for lobster – he cooked them in them as well (and noted that he worked in the lobster business for forty-one years so a good sign!).

      I now have this crazy ‘need’ to buy some awesome shellfish just to freeze. Heheh.

      Thanks for sharing – will try this this year!
      :)

      Joel

  3. Dave Frary says:

    Forty-one years in the lobster business. I had a lot of lobster I couldn’t sell. It was cooked and frozen in milk. When thawed it was a little chewier than fresh meat but good when chopped fine and used in a dip.
    I tried freezing it uncooked but the meat fell apart when thawed – not an appetizing texture!

    • Dave,

      I’ve never heard about freezing or cooking milk – fascinated by the idea and your post is likely to inspire a meal in this house at some point this year!

      We’ve had the same experience as you with uncooked lobster… Wonder if it would be useful ground in a dumpling or in soup or something…

      Thanks for sharing – must have been an amazing forty-one years! There’s been so many changes that I’ve seen from the sidelines in less time; I can’t imagine what it’s been like in the middle of it! :)

      Joel

  4. Andrew Tunstall says:

    That was not just an Acadian issue either. I have a lot of friends here in Nova Scotia whose parents grew up in Cape Breton and went through the same thing. To this day some of my friends’ parents refuse to eat lobster because they were forced to pick through the discarded lobster at fish packing plants to scrounge up food for school meals.

    • Andrew,

      I may be related to your friends! :) I know it’s a much bigger place than that of course (I spent a lot of time there in my youth) – my Mother is Acandian from Isle Madame – about 45 minutes outside of Port Hawksbury. :)

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