WellPreserved.ca http://wellpreserved.ca Make Something. Share It. Wed, 23 Apr 2014 12:05:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 The Most Surprising Ingredient in Cooking School http://wellpreserved.ca/the-most-surprising-ingredient-in-cooking-school/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-most-surprising-ingredient-in-cooking-school http://wellpreserved.ca/the-most-surprising-ingredient-in-cooking-school/#comments Wed, 23 Apr 2014 12:05:49 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17828 I’ve taken a few cooking courses from the George Brown School Hospitality and Culinary Arts over the last two years.  I started them with my Father (who has now taken more courses than I have) and have found them to be full of knowledge, advice and time to practice.  They’ve been very useful. I took […]

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I’ve taken a few cooking courses from the George Brown School Hospitality and Culinary Arts over the last two years.  I started them with my Father (who has now taken more courses than I have) and have found them to be full of knowledge, advice and time to practice.  They’ve been very useful.

I took each class with an open mind and knew there would be a few surprises; but one was bigger than them all.  I couldn’t believe the amount of cheesecloth we used!

I’ll admit that calling cheesecloth an ‘ingredient’ (per the title of this post) is a bit of a stretch on first glance but when it came to class it didn’t feel that way.  Herbs, spices and other ingredients were commonly wrapped in cheesecloth to infuse flavor into dishes (so that you could later pull the solids out).

Cheesecloth is often used in preserving (especially for jelly though it is used in other styles as well) but I hadn’t used it when making soups, stews or stocks.  It’s amazing how much flavor you can impart by tying ingredients in a small bag of cheesecloth and adding them to your cooking.

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What Causes Legs in Wine? http://wellpreserved.ca/causes-legs-wine/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=causes-legs-wine http://wellpreserved.ca/causes-legs-wine/#comments Wed, 23 Apr 2014 01:48:08 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17826 I’m in love with this short film because it shows me something I’ve known for more than 20 years – except it shows it in a completely different light. “Legs” on wine refer to the trails of wine that run down the insides of the glass after you drink or swish the glass.  What causes […]

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I’m in love with this short film because it shows me something I’ve known for more than 20 years – except it shows it in a completely different light.

“Legs” on wine refer to the trails of wine that run down the insides of the glass after you drink or swish the glass.  What causes them?  Instead of answering that with theory, Dan Quinn grabbed a video camera, sped it up and shows us what happens:

How cool is that?!?

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10 Things I’ve Learned from Preserving That Apply to Business http://wellpreserved.ca/10-things-ive-learned-from-preserving-that-apply-to-business/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=10-things-ive-learned-from-preserving-that-apply-to-business http://wellpreserved.ca/10-things-ive-learned-from-preserving-that-apply-to-business/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 01:23:14 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17823 Last week I wrote an article about 10 Things I’ve Learned In Business that Apply to Preserving – this week I’m flipping the idea and sharing ideas from my kitchen that I apply to work. In no particular order, here are things I’ve learned from Preserving that Apply to Work of any type: Patience When […]

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Last week I wrote an article about 10 Things I’ve Learned In Business that Apply to Preserving – this week I’m flipping the idea and sharing ideas from my kitchen that I apply to work.

In no particular order, here are things I’ve learned from Preserving that Apply to Work of any type:

  1. Patience
    When I’m making a big batch of preserves on a hot summer day it’s important to stay relaxed, loose and having fun.  Someone once told me that it’s “tough to get good at anything you don’t enjoy” and remember to be patient/ have fun when the heat is key to success – in the kitchen or at work.
  2. Time can improve things
    Fermenting, dehydrating or making pickles all take time to develop flavor.  At work this means that the first idea isn’t always the best and letting it sit for a while will often improve the results.
  3. Watch your fingers, especially when tired
    I never plan to cut myself in the kitchen but it happens from time to time; generally when I’m tired or near the end of making something.  I’ve learned to take extra care when I feel the same way at work.
  4. Take pride – but not too much
    There’s a certain satisfaction in what we’ve produced that inspires us to produce more.  It’s fun to take a few moments to look at the shelf of preserves we’ve put up over the last few years – as long as we don’t get stuck in reflecting on the past.  Past momentum helps build momentum in the present to push forward.
  5. Share your work
    Share your preserves and share the things you do at work – the more you do, the more you’ll receive in return.  Sharing creates community, support and collaboration at work and at home.
  6. Taste as you go
    A few years ago I preserved every pea that came into our house.  I didn’t eat a single one fresh and realized once pea season was over.  I’ve learned to enjoy fresh veg and fruit when they’re available as well as taste jam and other things as they’re being made.  Same thing applies to work – check your progress often as opposed to waiting for the end to find out how you did.
  7. Research in advance
    Reading recipes, blogs, magazines and brainstorming all allow me to preserve and cook things that I get great joy from and couldn’t do without preparing in advance.  The same applies to work – spend some time planning what you’re going to do before running ahead.
  8. Keep a secret stash of supplies
    I have am extra set of every size jar that I use, extra rings lids, sugar and vinegar hidden in a box in the basement.  There’s nothing worse than running out of supplies at the time that you need you most and my secret stash has saved me many late night dashes to try to find last-minute items.
  9. Share your knowledge
    I almost excluded this because of point 5 (share your work); the principal is the same but it’s just as important.  I know so many people who are expert preservers who will gladly swap jars but say that they “don’t know enough to share” when it comes to preserving.  The more you share, the more you’ll learn.
  10. Make tasty things
    When I preserve I make food that I’m excited about and it makes me want to make more.  If it didn’t taste good, it wouldn’t be worth it and it wouldn’t excite me to make more.  When I work I try to make things that excite me – they’re far more fun and generally better received by others!

Of course there are exceptions to any of these items but they serve me well – what would you add to the list?

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A Trick for Storing Dried Thyme http://wellpreserved.ca/trick-storing-dried-thyme/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=trick-storing-dried-thyme http://wellpreserved.ca/trick-storing-dried-thyme/#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 23:12:57 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17821 I store most of my dried herbs in mason jars.  It’s an easy choice because we have lots of them, they fit on our shelves easily and (most importantly) they have lids to keep humidity, moisture and dust away from our dried herbs. But that’s not my trick.  Take a look at this photo and […]

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I store most of my dried herbs in mason jars.  It’s an easy choice because we have lots of them, they fit on our shelves easily and (most importantly) they have lids to keep humidity, moisture and dust away from our dried herbs.

But that’s not my trick.  Take a look at this photo and see if you can figure out another advantage of using mason for storing thyme:

how to store dried herbs, how to store dried thyme, how to sore home dried thyme

Need a hint?  Look at the bottom of the jar – there’s a bunch of leaves that aren’t attached to stems.

To remove the leaves from the stems of dried thyme all you need to do is shake the jar a few times.  When you shake the jar the thyme will rub against itself and fall easily to the bottom.

For best results:

  1. Make sure to leave the lid on.
  2. Make sure there’s room at the top of the jar so the thyme can move a few inches up and down.

To use it, remove the lid and loosely hold your fingers (to prevent stems from falling out) – the leaves will easily pass through!

Do ou have a better trick?  I’d love to hear it!

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A Change for the 2014 Moose Hunt in Ontario http://wellpreserved.ca/change-2014-moose-hunt-ontario/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=change-2014-moose-hunt-ontario http://wellpreserved.ca/change-2014-moose-hunt-ontario/#comments Fri, 18 Apr 2014 01:37:10 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17818 A small press release hit the internet from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources yesterday.  It includes the following statement: To ensure moose populations remain healthy and resilient, Ontario is reducing adult moose tags across the province by about 18 per cent for 2014. As a food hunter, I have mixed emotions about this.  If […]

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A small press release hit the internet from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources yesterday.  It includes the following statement:

To ensure moose populations remain healthy and resilient, Ontario is reducing adult moose tags across the province by about 18 per cent for 2014.

As a food hunter, I have mixed emotions about this.  If there is a lower population then I’m supportive of such change (after all, hunters have a bester interest in having more animals in the woods).  Lowering the amount of available hunting licenses is an example of proper stewardship of the forests and one of many tools that can be used to possibly increase the population for the future.

But lowering the amount of licenses does not guarantee an increase in population.  Ontario sets targets for long-term population of moose (you can read about that here).  There are a variety of factors that can lower (or raise) the population of moose in a given area:

I’ve spent most of my life in the forest that we hunt.  My Father has hunted there for longer than I’ve been alive.  We’ve been drastically impacted by the reduction of moose tags in our area over the last few years (they are harder and harder to get) and, after almost 30 years of increasing populations have seen the population decrease since the banning of the Spring Bear Hunt (which the Government is bringing back as a pilot in some areas).  Moose and bear do not live together (though they generally leave each other alone); an increase in the bear population will push moose out of the area.  I’m not suggesting it’s the only factor but it’s worth sharing that we’ve had more than 20 bear sightings in 40 years at our cabin – all but 2 were in the last 5 years.

Beyond the speculation of the interference of bears, the warmer climate also challenges the moose population.  This has been the first harsh winter in years in Ontario.  A lack of snow is problematic to moose as their long legs travel easily through deep drifts but wolves and other predators can struggle to keep pace.  The lack of snow and urban encroachment are very real threats to the moose population of Ontario.

I am not necessarily against the reduction of moose licenses in Ontario (I’ll need to do some open-minded research to truly understand the rationale).  But I dearly hope that we look beyond licenses and examine the complex interactions of the ecosystem to really understand what we need to do to help sustain and grow our moose population.

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10 Things I’ve Learned in Business That Apply to Preserving http://wellpreserved.ca/10-things-ive-learned-in-business-that-apply-to-preserving/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=10-things-ive-learned-in-business-that-apply-to-preserving http://wellpreserved.ca/10-things-ive-learned-in-business-that-apply-to-preserving/#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 15:53:59 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17813 I’ve worked in different businesses most of my life.  I’ve worked in all sorts of different companies in all sorts of roles.  I’ve never been a big believer in completely separating work from the rest of my life; there are all sorts of things I’ve learned at work that I use in the rest of […]

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I’ve worked in different businesses most of my life.  I’ve worked in all sorts of different companies in all sorts of roles.  I’ve never been a big believer in completely separating work from the rest of my life; there are all sorts of things I’ve learned at work that I use in the rest of my life – and all sorts of things I’ve learned in life that I use at work.

Here’s 10 things I’ve learned from work that apply to preserving:

  1. Teamwork
    A good team will out perform a group of solo-stars.  While I do plenty of preserving by myself it’s fun to preserve in small groups – especially when preserving large batches.  I adore a good pickle or jam session with Dana and/or a few friends, great music and a supply of wine or beer.
  2. Organization
    Be organized.  It makes the task easier, faster and more enjoyable when you’re making preserves.
  3. Planning
    I once made more than 300 jars of jam in 60 days.  I was jam-drunk.  I was having so much fun making jam that I didn’t think of the consequences – specifically what the heck I was going to with 300 jars of jam.
  4. Mesure twice, cut once
    Each year I make at least one dreadful mistake related to measuring.  I forget the sugar, double the vinegar or forget a key ingredient.  Read the recipe in advance, check as you go and measure everything carefully!
  5. Cheer the progress
    Take time to pat yourself and others on the back for preserving.  It feels good to put food up for the winter – celebrate the little victories to stay motivated.
  6. Fun
    It’s difficult to get good at anything you don’t enjoy.  Preserving is a lot of fun but if you’re too focused on the results it can be easy to forget to ‘fun’ part.
  7. Practice
    Make small batches (Food in Jars has a ton of recipes for them), swap with friends and preserve with others before making giant batches.  When learning to ferment hot sauce I would ferment a cup or hot peppers at a time (over the winter) before committing to make a gallon (or more) of hot sauce.
  8. Learn
    Read, study and watch videos.  Go beyond the usual sources and look for inspiration from other cultures, chefs, books, blogs and magazines.
  9. Share
    The more you share, the more that will be shared with you.  Talk to friends, family and others that share your passion and you’re bound to learn more about it.
  10. Coach
    When you’re comfortable with the process of preserving, help others learn how to do it.  The more you share your knowledge, the more you’ll learn!

What would you add to this list?

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3 Minutes of Reality; Preserved Food and Sad History http://wellpreserved.ca/3-minutes-reality-preserved-food-sad-history/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=3-minutes-reality-preserved-food-sad-history http://wellpreserved.ca/3-minutes-reality-preserved-food-sad-history/#comments Wed, 16 Apr 2014 01:54:41 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17810 This is a sobering 3-minutes. It’s a simple monologue from a Canadian woman named Mary who shares how her family depended on preserving meat in order to survive the winter and shares that starvation wasn’t the only threat.  It’s an important story to share; one that reminds me of the importance of the journey of […]

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This is a sobering 3-minutes.

It’s a simple monologue from a Canadian woman named Mary who shares how her family depended on preserving meat in order to survive the winter and shares that starvation wasn’t the only threat.  It’s an important story to share; one that reminds me of the importance of the journey of preserving as well as a reminder of a sobering part of Canadian History that’s rarely shared:

I know this goes beyond the levity of most things we share here; but it’s a video that’s really had me reflecting and thought others might appreciate the chance to see and share it as well.

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Book Review: Pickles & Preserves (A Savor the South Cookbook) http://wellpreserved.ca/book-review-pickles-preserves-savor-south-cookbook/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=book-review-pickles-preserves-savor-south-cookbook http://wellpreserved.ca/book-review-pickles-preserves-savor-south-cookbook/#comments Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:41:54 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17808 We’re close to spring and that means a lot of us are getting ready for our gardens, farmers markets and the ramping-up of preserving season.  All of this means it’s also the time of year where a bunch of cookbooks and preserving books hit the shelves. I was excited to receive an email from Andrea […]

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We’re close to spring and that means a lot of us are getting ready for our gardens, farmers markets and the ramping-up of preserving season.  All of this means it’s also the time of year where a bunch of cookbooks and preserving books hit the shelves.

I was excited to receive an email from Andrea Weigl who offered to send me a copy of her book to review.  When it comes to reviews like this we have a simple approach: we welcome people sending us copies but only write about it if we love it.

Savor the south book review

When I first received “Pickles and Preserves” I was surprised: there are no pictures.  In a day and age where cookbooks are ultra-competitive for design and photography, this is a rare exception.  It’s a relatively small book (96 pages) but it’s lack of pictures has an advantage: every page is rich with recipes and ideas.  I particularly like that the book is wrapped around 3 tiers:

  • Jams, Jellies and Preserves
  • Pickles
  • Relishes, Chutneys and More

The book includes recipes for waterbath preserving as well as for fridge pickles, freezer jam and more.

Each recipe has a note to start it off; the notes usually talk about the history of the recipe, a story about where it came from or who inspired it.  These stories make you feel the spirit of community that inspired the book and informs the collection of recipes from start-to-finish.  This is a book about the people that fill jars with food as much as it is about the jars themselves.

savor the south cookbook review

If it sounds like I’m lukewarm about this book, I’m not: I’ve saved the best for last.  Andrea shares recipes that are traditional in the US South – and many of them were completely unknown to me.  Some of the less-common recipes (from my perspective) include:

  • Soft refrigerator Honeysuckle Jelly
  • Damson Plum Jelly
  • Muscadine Jam
  • Refrigerator Sweet Potato Butter
  • Pear Honey
  • Mesquite Bean JellySalt-Pickles Cucumbers with Shiso
  • Pickled Peppers Stuffed with Shredded Cabbage
  • Jerusalem Artichoke Pickles
  • Spiced Grapes
  • Jerusalem Artichoke Relish
  • Gammaw’s Marinated Carrots

These recipes are, to me, what makes this book magical.  It introduces me to new ideas and techniques that will expand my pantry beyond where it is now.  And that, to me, is the ultimate test of any new book.

Have you preserved any of those types of preserves?  I’d love to know what you thought of them.

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What Temperature to Dehydrate Food at http://wellpreserved.ca/temperature-dehydrate-food/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=temperature-dehydrate-food http://wellpreserved.ca/temperature-dehydrate-food/#comments Sat, 12 Apr 2014 00:09:59 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17804 I wrote an article a few years ago that walked through the theory (i.e. WHY) of dehydrating food at different temperatures.  I also gave a few examples but fell short with a definitive guide. Here’s a quick guide, courtesy of the thermostat of our Excalibur Dehydrator: Herbs (95F/ 35C) Living Foods (105F / 41C) Raising […]

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I wrote an article a few years ago that walked through the theory (i.e. WHY) of dehydrating food at different temperatures.  I also gave a few examples but fell short with a definitive guide.

Here’s a quick guide, courtesy of the thermostat of our Excalibur Dehydrator:

  • Herbs (95F/ 35C)
  • Living Foods (105F / 41C)
  • Raising Bread (110F / 43C)
  • Making Yogurt (115F / 46C)
  • Vegetables (125F / 52C)
  • Fruits/ Fruit Rolls (135F / 57C)
  • Meats/ Fish (155F / 68C)
  • Jerky (155F / 68C)

While that’s a decent guideline, there’s a few things to keep in mind, including some fine print:

  • The dehydrator gets warmer than those temperatures.  A thermostat on an Excalibur is set for the surface area of the food (which will never equal the ambient temperature of the air around it).  The actual temperature of the air fluctuates; at it’s highest it’s around 10 degrees higher than the numbers above (but the food is at the temperatures in the chart).
  • Many want to keep the integrity of living food in tact and dehydrate everything at a lower setting.  The disadvantage of doing so is that it can take much longer to dry things and be more expensive and some food (such as meat) isn’t safe at certain temperatures.  When I dehydrate Ghost Peppers (they are SUPER hot) I generally don’t worry about the temperature as I’ll never eat enough dried Ghost Peppers to gain any significant nutritional value.
  • Some food (especially meat and seafood) must be dried at an ambient temperature of 165F or more (the guide above says ’155F’ but the first bullet explains the variance).  I share this because dehydrating allows us to safely experiment a lot – but there are certain safety precautions you should always follow (I always look to the National Center for Home Food Preservation for such guidance)
  • Circulation is a vital component.  Herbs will dry at 95 degrees (and even less) if they have free airflow.  Jam them in a plastic bag and they won’t do what you’re hoping.
  • The above are guidelines.  Experimentation may reveal that you prefer different temperatures (I love to air dry mushrooms without added heat for example).
  • The end result matters.  I sometimes ferment dried hot peppers and dehydrate them at lower temperatures to keep as many of the nutrients/ bacteria in tact as possible.
  • Lastly, you might not have an option.  Many people dry food in dehydrators that don’t have a thermostat.  It’s not the end of the world as long as you’re following their guidance (some of these units call for pre-cooking of meat in order to make jerky as an example).

What are your tips for ‘the right temperature’ when dehydrating?

 

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Book Review: Preserving by the Pint (Marisa McClellan) http://wellpreserved.ca/book-review-preserving-pint-marisa-mcclellan/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=book-review-preserving-pint-marisa-mcclellan http://wellpreserved.ca/book-review-preserving-pint-marisa-mcclellan/#comments Thu, 10 Apr 2014 11:35:33 +0000 http://wellpreserved.ca/?p=17800 I occasionally get frustrated by how complicated and scary that certain books or articles make preserving sound.  I’m not a renegade (I’m one of the more cautious people I know when it comes to these things) but we sometimes make preserving sound like a near-seat activity with warning labels larger than we place on alcohol […]

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I occasionally get frustrated by how complicated and scary that certain books or articles make preserving sound.  I’m not a renegade (I’m one of the more cautious people I know when it comes to these things) but we sometimes make preserving sound like a near-seat activity with warning labels larger than we place on alcohol or cigarettes.

I’m also cautious when it comes to haphazard writing that encourages people to contravene standards set by science, safety or common sense.

Marisa’s book weaves a wonderful path away from both extremes.  Although her instructions and eyes to safety will keep you on the right track it’s the tone of her writing that I adore the most.  When reading the book it’s easy to imagine that you’re sitting on a stool at a farmer’s market discussing jam with her.

preserving by the pint, food in jars, marisa mclellan, book review

This is the follow-up book to Food in Jars (named after her incredibly popular and well-respected website of the same name).  It’s focus is small-batch preserving; most of the recipes are 1-2 pints.  This makes the recipes quick to make and easy to store.

  1. Once again the book is beautiful.  The photography is great and the design elements are sweet.
  2. It’s seasonal.  Each of the 4 sections are almost equal in length which thrills me.  Winter recipes aren’t an afterthought that were thrown in to make things work; this book is absolutely useful all year long.
  3. There are multiple techniques.  Fermenting, freezing and water bath recipes can all be found in it.
  4. The recipes are simple.  Although they’re easy to follow, it’s the confidence in simple ingredients and flavours (many of the recipes have 3-5 ingredients) that make her recipes shine here.
  5. The small batch concept.  I know I’ve mentioned this above but this is a great resource for showing how easy preserving can be and for saving small batches of food that you might otherwise lose.

preserving by the pint book review

As I read through the book I was floored to read a mention of Dana and I and WellPreserved.  Marisa and I have been online friends for the last few years and we had chatted about my ‘Blueberry Crack’ recipe (it’s made of wild blueberries and maple syrup) and she had made a tweaked version of it.  She used her version of the recipe in her book and went above-and-beyond by sharing us as the influence behind it.  I am beyond thankful.

Marisa is travelling extensively to promote the book.  Try to get out to meet her at an event or grab a copy of the book for your self (affiliate link).

preserving by the pint book review

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