Is Maldon Salt Worth the Price?

My Father and I have taken a few cooking course together at a local college and we’ve often heard the Chefs praise “Maldon Salt.” I’d heard the same from Chef friends and really hadn’t experienced it until about a year ago.

If you haven’t heard of Maldon Salt before, it’s a type of Sea Salt that is produced in the U.K. The manufacturers claim that it doesn’t leave a “bitter after taste that some salts leave; instead a freshness that enhances the flavour of all natural and fine foods.” I can vouch that it tastes like salt but I haven’t experienced a bitter after taste in any salt that I can recall.

If the virtues of Maldon Salt were limited to taste then the benefits would be tough to justify when compared to the cost (it can cost 2-3 times the amount of other sea salt).

The real magic of Maldon Salt is it’s texture.  The salt comes in flaky pieces.  Each piece is a different size and shape and adds legitimate texture when used to finish (i.e. used when serving) a dish.  Salad, fish and meat are enhanced with a subtle crunch that’s added with the salt.

Although I’m sure some people cook with it, I keep other salt on hand for that.  When used to finish dishes, maldon salt can last a long time and add a noticeable different that, in my mind, is worth the increased price.

Are you willing to pay extra for maldon salt?

Inglorious Fruit and Vegetables: France Battles Food Waste

In my TEDxToronto speech I called out the practice of wasting ‘ugly fruit and vegetables.’  I’m not the first one to make this plea and I won’t be the last.

The David Suzuki Foundation estimates that “Over 30 percent of fruits and vegetables in North America don’t even make it onto store shelves because they’re not pretty enough for picky consumers.”

The main reason that’s usually given for not selling ‘ugly’ food is that consumers will not buy it.  A major retailler in France just challenged this assumption and found quite the opposite.  Watch this 2.5 minute video and see how they’ve brought attention to this issue and celebrate the ‘ugly’ food: